Saturday, September 22, 2018

Stumpy

We've not seen the Baby Bandidos in the past few days, although that doesn't mean they haven't been by. We do sleep while they are out and about. But we have seen Northern Raccoons. Including this one, which has visited our yard on multiple occasions.


We are maybe three meters or so about from each other, and it is interesting how the critters look but don't seem to see us. Maybe the window acts as a mirror? But that doesn't explain the screens, nor the sounds through said screens.


Somehow they just know that as long as we are inside we post no threat. But as soon as we open the doors they scamper away.


And how, I'm sure you're wondering, do we know that this one has visited before. Well, the picture above gives it away. This particular raccoon has no tail.

I wonder as to the story of how it was lost.

Friday, September 21, 2018

Closer to Home

The hurricane that clobbered the Carolinas decided to stay down south. So no, this post was not a harbinger of Florence.

That doesn't mean we escaped unscathed.


We have a compost pile just over this little bridge. And as I was taking some kitchen waste to add to the pile I was greeted with these views.


And no, we didn't hear it.

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Unwanted Visitor

So after the raccoons came and left we put our some more food, this time cat food.

And we attracted a cat. Not what we were going for.


🐈🐈🐈🐈🐈

It seems there is a feral cat colony a couple hundred yards down the road from us, in an abandoned house. We've trapped several and taken them to the county animal shelter (we adopted one of our three cats from this same shelter).

Cats are a non-native species and are best kept, as with our three, indoors.* And while this one looks healthy, in general they have ticks, fleas, can spread diseases, and are somewhat malnourished.

Not a happy life.

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* Our cats do get outdoor time, albeit in a controlled fashion. One of our cats did get outside recently and went missing for four days. We thought he as gone. But he was found and returned, after a trip to the vet to get many ticks removed, by a neighbor, who knew it must be someone's pet. This woman went door to door on our street to find us.  

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Baby Bandidos

Thursday evening, as we sat in the living room watching football, with for some reason commentary in Spanish, a family of Northern Raccoons stopped by.

I got the camera, Patty the spot light, and after turning the game, and any other lights, off I took some pictures.

Mama raccoon headed into the shadows. But these three stayed and gobbled down the peanut butter.


We put the peanut butter out for the flying squirrels. But opossums and raccoons enjoy it as well.


Raccoons are regular visitors. But this is the first time we've seen a mom bring her kids around. We'll be watching to see if she brings them back.

~~~~~~~~~~

The came back the very next night. But there were only two Baby Bandidos. That is not good.

And yes, we had put out more food. They seemed to enjoy it.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Yard Critter of the Week

Yellow Garden Spider.


These large spiders are rather obvious in garden areas in late summer and early fall, appearing seemingly out of nowhere. In reality they've been there all along, just smaller. And the large ones, like the one pictured here, are females. The males are not as bright and only a quarter to a third of the size of the ladies.


Like the Praying (or is it "Preying"?) Mantis featured few weeks ago, these spiders will eat anything caught in their webs, including the aforementioned mantis. You want these in your garden for 'pest' control (in scare quotes as they'll eat both desirable and undesirable insects).


The prominent zigzag webbing is called a "stabilimenta" as it was originally thought to help stabilize the web. But the true use is not yet known. My favorite explanation is that it is a sign to ward off birds. The idea being the birds, which would have otherwise not seen the web, will see this and avoid flying through, and thus destroying, the web.

As we plant to attract pollinating insects, our gardens are teeming with bugs. And these spiders set up shop throughout to take advantage of the bounty. A sign methinks that we have a healthy yard.

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You can find all of the Yard Critter of the Week posts listed here.

Saturday, September 15, 2018

Friday, September 14, 2018

Uh Oh

I hope this is not a harbinger of Florence ...